Walmart is blasted over TikTok clip showing supermarket giant ‘preparing to throw away $200,000 worth of food’

A shocking new video appearing to show shopping carts packed with fresh produce in a Walmart store room as workers prepare throw out the food.

The clip was posted online by a TikTok user who wrote in the caption that the total value of the food that was to be discarded was $200,000. 

‘There’s already starting to be a slight smell,’ one worker says in the video. ‘Yeah, there’s a heavy smell,’ the other staffer replies.  At the time of writing, the video has been viewed nearly half a million times. 

It is unclear when and where the clip was shot. DailyMail.com has contacted Walmart for comment.  

Many of those commenting under the original TikTok post speculated that the video was shot in a store that had lost power due hot weather – and that staff had no choice but to throw out the food as it was on the verge of spoiling. 

Others pointed out how inconceivable it was that the retail giant could simply throw out so much food when around 34 million people in the US are food insecure, meaning they do not know where their next meal is coming from, according to Feeding America. 

The video comes as Walmart begins to shutter stores across the country while also reporting an increase in in-store thefts. DailyMail.com has reached out to Walmart for comment on this story.  

A new video apparently shows retail giant Walmart preparing to throw out $200,000 worth of food

A new video apparently shows retail giant Walmart preparing to throw out $200,000 worth of food

In the clip, a store worker says that the produce is beginning to 'smell' while pokcing what appears to be a piece of steak

In the clip, a store worker says that the produce is beginning to ‘smell’ while pokcing what appears to be a piece of steak 

A similar video was posted in November 2022 showing food filled carts lined up in a Walmart store in South Carolina apparently being prepared to be thrown out. 

While a Reddit post apparently showed a dump truck discarding hundreds of pounds of fruits and vegetables in a dump. In 2016, a CBC feature in Canada showed photos and videos of dozens of trash cans outside of Walmart stores filled to the brim with food. 

It’s estimated by the USDA that one third of of all food goes uneaten in the US.  

The person who posted that video said that they contacted Walmart about the wastage and was told that the company has a policy of not donating food. 

According to a section on Walmart’s corporate website said that its policy is to sell on food that is close to its sell-by date at a reduced price to ‘through food discount products.’ 

In 2022, Walmart said that it sold ‘more than 190 million food units’ through food discount programs. 

Unpurchased food is then given to food banks or other charities, Walmart says. The giant donated nearly 700 million pounds of food in the US  in 2022.

A similar video appeared in 2022, showing shopping carts packed with food items that were being thrown out

A similar video appeared in 2022, showing shopping carts packed with food items that were being thrown out 

Many were horrified by the apparent waste while Walmart says on its website that the company donates or recycles all unsold food

Many were horrified by the apparent waste while Walmart says on its website that the company donates or recycles all unsold food

The video comes as Walmart begins to shutter stores across the country while also reporting an increase in in-store thefts

The video comes as Walmart begins to shutter stores across the country while also reporting an increase in in-store thefts

Food that is spoiled is sent to be converted into animal feed, compost or energy, the company statement says. 

Stores in Argentina, China, Chile, Japan, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the US, ‘send a portion of their food waste to anaerobic digestion plants, which break down the food into gases that can be used as fuel and fertilizers.’

The company said that it hopes to be at zero percent waste by 2025.  

Experts say growing awareness of food waste and its incredible cost — both in dollars and in environmental impact — has led to an uptick in efforts to mitigate it. U.S. food waste startups raised $4.8 billion in 2021, 30 percent more than they raised in 2020, according to ReFed, a group that studies food waste. 

‘This has suddenly become a big interest,’ said Elizabeth Mitchum, director of the Postharvest Technology Center at the University of California, Davis, who has worked in the field for three decades. 

‘Even companies that have been around for a while are now talking about what they do through that lens.’

In 2019, around 35 percent of the 229 million tons of food available in the U.S. — worth around $418 billion — went unsold or uneaten, according to ReFed. 

Food waste is the largest category of material placed in municipal landfills, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which notes that rotting food releases methane, a problematic greenhouse gas.

ReFed estimates 500,000 pounds of food could be diverted from landfills annually with high-tech packaging.

Among the products in development are a sensor by Stockholm-based Innoscentia that can determine whether meat is safe depending on the buildup of microbes in its packaging. 

And Ryp Labs, based in the U.S. and Belgium, is working on a produce sticker that would release a vapor to slow ripening.

Kroger, the nation’s largest grocery chain, ended its multiyear partnership with Goleta, California-based Apeel Sciences this year because it found consumers weren’t willing to pay more for produce brushed or sprayed with Apeel’s edible coating to keep moisture in and oxygen out, thus extending the time that produce stays fresh. 


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